Did you know 2022 Alzheimer disease viagra ? – Health care

Alzheimer disease viagra

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Alzheimer disease viagra
Alzheimer disease viagra

Dec. 15, 2021 – Viagra dysfunctional drugs may be used as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Aging.

Patients who used the drug sildenafil, which is a common name for Viagra, were 69% less likely to develop the disease than those who did not.

“Sildenafil, which has been shown to significantly improve comprehension and memory in preclinical models, has been introduced as the best drug candidate,” Feixiong Cheng, Ph.D., lead study author at Cleveland Clinic’s Genomic Medicine Institute, said in a statement.

Affects

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of age-related dementia, affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide.
The disease is expected to affect an estimated 14 million Americans by 2050. There is no prescriptive drug that will stop the flow of emotions.

Cheng and his colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic used a large genetic network to analyze whether more than 1,600 FDA-approved drugs could be effective against Alzheimer’s.
They have given high points in medications that target both amyloid and tau proteins in the brain, which are two symptoms of the disease. Sildenafil appears at the top of the list.

relationship

Researchers then used a database of health insurance applications for more than 7 million people in the U.S. to understand the relationship between sildenafil and the effects of Alzheimer’s disease.
They compared sildenafil users with non-users and found that those who used the drug were less than 69% more likely to have the neurodegenerative disease, even after 6 years of follow-up.

Next, the research team came up with a lab model showing that sildenafil increased brain cell growth and targeted tau protein.
A lab model can show how a drug influences disease-related brain changes.

But Cheng cautioned against reaching solid conclusions.
Studies do not show a causal relationship between sildenafil and Alzheimer’s disease.
Researchers will need to perform clinical trials with a placebo control to see how the drug works.

Some researchers

Some researchers say that the findings provide a new way to do research but have not yet provided solid answers.

“Being able to re-use a drug that is already licensed for medical conditions can help speed up the drug discovery process and bring about life-changing treatment for dementia quickly,” Susan Kohlhaas, Ph.D., research director at Alzheimer’s Research UK, told Science Media Center.

“Importantly, this study does not include evidence that sildenafil is responsible for reducing the risk of dementia, or that it reduces or stops the disease,” he continued.
“If you want to discuss any of the treatments you receive, the first place to call is to talk to your doctor.”

treatment

And doctors will probably not recommend it as a treatment yet.

“Although this data is scientifically interesting, based on this study, I will not immediately start taking sildenafil as a preventative against Alzheimer’s disease,” said Tara Spires-Jones, Ph.D., deputy director of the Center for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University. Edinburgh told Science Media Center.

Can Viagra Reduce the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease? What we know

  • New research has found that people who take Viagra are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Experts emphasize that more research is needed to confirm the results.
  • Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s.

The antidepressant, which is also used to treat high blood pressure, has already shown promise Promising a reliable source of treatment or prevention for Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Now, new research adds to the evidence of finding this popular drug that can help reduce the risk of developing a deteriorating condition.

“After a search of the literature, we found several animal studies showing the potential therapeutic effects of sildenafil in various AD models,” lead researcher Feixiong Cheng, Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Genomic Medicine Institute, told Healthline.

Cheng and the team analyzed data from more than 7 million people to receive sildenafil (Viagra) significantly reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

The study looked at more than 1,000 FDA-approved drugs

The study used insurance data, a large genetic mapping network, and integrated genetic information and other information to determine which of the 1,600 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have proven effective against Alzheimer’s disease.

According to Cheng, many direct drug discovery projects or protein alone have not been successful in the last 20 years.

But in this project, they explored a new theory that “double-blindness” for both amyloid and tau at the same time may provide better clinical benefits for people with Alzheimer’s.

He explained that Alzheimer’s disease is a “complex disease caused by many factors,” and that multi-target drugs or combination therapy to target more than one disease may provide significant benefits in treating the disease.

“By examining this hypothetical novel, we have identified sildenafil as a possible treatment for AD,” said Cheng.

Participants had a 70% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease

After 6 years of follow-up, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic found that people taking sildenafil were 69 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those who did not take medication.

To further test the drug’s effectiveness in treating Alzheimer’s disease, Cheng and the team developed a laboratory model that showed sildenafil targeted tau protein and increased brain cell growth, showing how the drug might work against degenerative conditions.

It is important to note that research has not found that sildenafil reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Cheng acknowledged that there are limitations to the need for further research.

“While we have fixed many confusing factors in our analysis of patient data based on our large efforts, potential confusing factors may be present in our limited medical knowledge of this complex disease,” he said.

“We are working hard to pursue the RCT (randomized controlled trial) in the next step,” Cheng said.

The study was very limited

“This study looks at data from a very large population, but there are several important limitations to consider,” said Professor Tara Spires-Jones, DPhil, deputy director of the Center for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. statement.

According to Spi-Jones, the research data came from insurance claims, was not very detailed, and did not include information on other important aspects of Alzheimer’s risk, such as sex, genetic predisposition, and socioeconomic status.

Spires-Jones pointed out that there are other possible explanations for these findings.

“For example, we know that brain changes begin decades before symptoms of dementia [show] and these early Alzheimer’s changes may reduce sexual desire, so people would not request a prescription for erectile dysfunction,” he explained.

Only one drug is approved to treat Alzheimer’s

AducanumabTrusted Source (Aduhelm) is a drug recently approved by the FDA to treat Alzheimer’s disease. To date, the only drug approved for this purpose.

Approved FDA a credited reliable source. This program allows for the early approval of medicines for severe cases and fulfills a “medical need that can be met” based on the mark, such as laboratory measurements, physical markings, or other dosages that may predict clinical benefit.

“Aducanumab is not a cure for Alzheimer’s disease,” said Drs. Winston Chiong, a member of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Ethics, Law, and Humanities Committee, told the Psychiatric Times.

According to the Weill Institute for Neurosciences, about 40 percent of aducanumab people experience amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA).

This condition involves bleeding of the brain, inflammation of the brain, or both.

“About 10 percent of those who use the drug will need to stop treatment for ARIA-related concerns,” the center said.

Lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s

A study published in June 2020 found that following at least 4 out of 5 healthy lifestyles could reduce the risk of dementia by 60 percent.

The practices were:

  • physical activity
  • non-smoker
  • light consumption to alcohol levels
  • eating high-quality food
  • mental diligence

“This observational study provides further evidence of how a combination of behavioral behaviors can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” Drs. Richard J. HodesTrusted Source, director of the National Institute on Aging, in a statement at Trusted Source.

An important point

A new study finds that sildenafil, an FDA drug approved for the treatment of high blood pressure and erectile dysfunction, can reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 69 percent.

Experts say the study had serious limitations and showed only exposure to reduced risk.

They also say that simple lifestyle changes, such as smoking and keeping busy, can significantly reduce the risk of dementia.

High levels of iron in the brain may be a factor in Alzheimer’s disease

A type of metal called magnetite may lead researchers on the path to effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

Magnetite is rarely found in the human brain, but researchers say that iron is present in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists say that magnetite is found in an unusual protein group known as amyloid plaque that is a hallmark of the disease.

Understanding why they exist can lead to effective treatment.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, about 6 million people in the United States are living with the disease

Alzheimer’s is the sixth-leading cause of death in the country.

The organization also reports that Alzheimer’s disease increased by 123 percent between 2000 and 2015 and that cardiovascular death (number one death) decreased by 11 percent.

The Centers for Disease Control and PreventionTrusted Source (CDC) reports that age is a major risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s, although genetics also play a major role.

Detailed evidence

Researchers have previously indicated that minerals will form when iron and amyloid protein combine.

However, using advanced synchrotron X-ray centers in the United States and the United Kingdom, the team was able to show detailed evidence that these processes occur in the brains of people who have died of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. James Hendrix, director of international science programs at the Alzheimer’s Association, told Healthline that “iron is an important factor in the brain, so it is important to gather more data on how its management can affect Alzheimer’s disease.”

Not too much, or too little

For decades, iron was a major food allergy in the United States, so much of the food is now fortified with iron.

Baby food, breakfast cereals, pieces of bread, and even rice and pasta add added iron.

Iron deficiency is now more likely to occur in breastfeeding infants, as well as women and women who are pregnant, vegetarians, and people who use medications that cause internal bleeding or iron deficiency.

Recent research A reliable source from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) has also linked high iron levels to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers there say that contact may be due to excess iron that can cause oxidative stress, a type of damage to which the brain is highly sensitive.

The important role of iron

Hendrix says it is important to understand that recent research has not found that iron-rich foods can cause Alzheimer’s disease.

Larson clarified that the study was not about dietary iron.

“This study is about a new way of exploring the role that iron may play in vessels that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.”

Regarding the potential role this may play in Alzheimer’s, he states: “It is noteworthy that we have found many people who die without evidence of dementia, even in the past, without these plaques.”

Recent research has shown that iron deficiency can have a detrimental effect on memory, although it does play an important role in maintaining the brain and nervous system. Said Hendrix

“This is a preliminary study and we do not know how iron gets into amyloid plaque. But too little iron can hurt health, ”says Hendrix.

Can we prevent Alzheimer’s disease?

Larson is convinced that there is no perfect way to prevent Alzheimer’s in the way we can prevent polio with a vaccine.

Hendrix emphasizes that genes are primarily a factor in determining who will be infected.

However, some strategies can help.

“We know that the Mediterranean diet can have some benefits. Regular physical activity helps. ” Said, Hendrix. “What is good for your heart is also good for your brain.”

He recommends reading 10 Ways to Love Your Brain on the Alzheimer’s Association website to learn more ways to maintain mental health and reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Treating Alzheimer’s Disease Can Be Easier Than We Think

Emerging research shows that lowering blood sugar levels by using insulin in the nose can help prevent symptoms of dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease, which affects 5 million Americans, provides a powerful study across Western medicine. New technologies allow researchers to examine genetic mutations, monitor real-time brain activity, and synthesize drugs from both biological and chemical processes. Yet the causes of Alzheimer’s disease remain a mystery, and drugs that seemed promising early development have so far failed to reduce the devastating effects of the disease in real patients.

summary of progress

The emerging research angle, highlighted in the annual summary of progress The Against Disease states by the National Institutes of Health, removes the focus on amyloid-beta and tau proteins in the brain and targets the best-understood biological characters: sugar. and insulin. If research eventually proves that their interactions play a role in the cause of Alzheimer’s disease, it could give doctors a clue as to how to treat it.

The study began by recognizing that diabetics were at greater risk for dementia than the general public.

And a University of Washington study published last year in the New England Journal of Medicine found that in both diabetics and non-diabetics alike, high blood sugar levels were associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia.

caused

Those dangerous glucose levels are caused by a combination of poor diet, inadequate exercise, and individual metabolism. The findings are consistent with existing research that exercise reduces the risk of dementia.

“According to the data on the effects of dementia, we have a lot of data about calories other than calories in it. Many studies suggest that exercise is good for mental performance; there are very few studies based on caloric reduction. This seems to be further evidence supporting Your very best is a good idea, ”lead researcher Dr. Paul Crane told Healthline.

Can Low Blood Sugar Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

The hypothesis that high glucose levels may predispose to Alzheimer’s disease seems promising especially in the growing understanding that patients begin to accumulate amyloid-beta deposits of disease in the brain years before they show symptoms of memory loss.

Insulin, which controls glucose in the body, also plays a role in regulating amyloid-beta.

“We believe that insulin resistance begins in life, and this is the time when most people begin to experience obesity and weight gain and other metabolic changes,” Suzanne Craft, co-author of the current study at Wake Forest University, explains the video.

result

HBO for Alzheimer’s disease. At the same time, we believe that beta-amyloid is increasing, in large part because of these changes in insulin resistance, and as a result, we see symptoms begin to occur, memory problems, which get worse over time until a person is healthy. how to develop Alzheimer’s disease. “

Lower blood sugar over time can reduce amyloid-beta deposits and reduce a person’s risk of dementia.

Insulin Inhaler Promising Treatment

Craft has investigated, in a series of studies, giving patients insulin in the nasal passages that send hormones directly to the brain. The brain has several insulin receptors, including areas that play a key role in memory. This approach does not require patients to follow medical advice to eat well and exercise, as many patients are resisting attempts to change their lifestyles.

Surprisingly, within a few weeks or months of inhaler treatment, patients in the studies showed improvement in mood. In various trials of this method, Craft has worked with both diabetics and non-diabetics, patients with mild mental retardation, and those with complete dementia.

Can Aerobic Exercise Improve Cognitive Activity And Reduce The Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease?

  • Researchers are investigating ways to help improve mental performance and reduce the risk of dementia.
  • One in three adults dies of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia and kills more people than breast and prostate cancer combined.
  • Now a new study has found evidence that one year of aerobic exercise training improved heart rate, brain blood flow control, and memory function in people with mild mental retardation.

Moderate to strenuous aerobic exercise may benefit older adults with mild mental retardation, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

The study

The study, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, found that one year of aerobic exercise training improves cardiorespiratory stamina, regulates brain blood flow, and memory function in people with mild mental retardation.

“Exercise is very important in improving muscle function and brain function,” said Rong Zhang, Ph.D., professor of neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, a research scientist at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, and research principal. investigator. “The brain is a unique organ. It requires constant blood flow and oxygen supply. ”

A few ways to combat the growing cases of dementia

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are among the major threats to public health in the country.

Although this study did not focus on combating Alzheimer’s disease directly, it did look at helping people with mild cognitive impairment. Moderate cognitive impairment has been shown to increase the risk of dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other emotional conditions.

Experts have been searching for ways to prevent all forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s. At the moment, there is no solution.

Research

Research on the subject has become increasingly stressful as Americans grow older faster. More than 10,000 people turn 65 each day.

One in three adults dies of Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia, and it kills more people than breast and prostate cancer combined. More than 6 million people over the age of 65 in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s disease, a figure expected to reach nearly 13 million by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

During the epidemic, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-related deaths increased by 16 percent.

Research findings

In this study, researchers identified 37 people aged 55 to 80 with mild mental retardation. These adults were diagnosed within 12 months.

For the first 10 weeks of the study, the subjects participated in three weekly exercise classes that included a quick 25- to 30-minute walk, according to Tsubasa Tomato, Ph.D., lead author of the paper, and his post-doctoral colleague at the Institute for Exercise. and Environmental Medicine at Texas Health Presbyterian and University of Texas Southwestern.

exercise sessions

At the start of the study, subjects participated in three fast-paced exercise sessions each week for 25 to 30 minutes. From week 11, they exercised 4 times a week, moving quickly up 30 to 35 minutes per session. After 26 weeks, exercise sessions increased to 4 to 5 times a week for 30 to 40 minutes.

Exercise and the risk of dementia

“While we do not currently have effective Alzheimer’s treatment, prevention is the most important key at this time,” Tomato said. “We are focused on mental dysfunction. Some studies suggest that if you do the intervention, you can have some hope in reducing Alzheimer’s. That is why we are focusing on this population. If you exercise, it can improve your performance and can lead to mental improvement. ”

“Exciting research,” said Caesar, director of neuro-oncology at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. “It proves the fact that exercise can improve heart and brain function in the short term. It is not flexibility, but this is good research in the sense that it writes this differently.”

Requirements

“The brain is a power pig, among the highest metabolic requirements of any tissue in the body,” Bikman explains.

He noted that exercise helps control insulin.

“While we should definitely [do] mental exercises to keep our brain sharp, such as learning a new language and learning a new instrument, this should not replace whole-body exercise, which helps a lot of physical activity, including mindfulness, to run smoothly.”

Caesar said the results of this study and others like it were huge.

“Exercise can improve your brain over time, and it’s good for you at the end of the day. The economic impacts of health care are enormous. It can reduce serious dementia over time and reduce health care costs. ”

What Alzheimer’s Causes on Your Body

Most people know that Alzheimer’s disease affects memory. But symptoms can be physical and mental.

It can change the way you walk, talk, and the way your body functions. It is important to be aware of what can happen as the disease progresses. This will help you to stay focused on the changes that you and your loved ones may face.

Mental and Physical Communication

These proteins form large clumps, called tangles and plaques. They enter the path of normal brain function and kill healthy cells.

Damage usually begins in the area of ​​your brain that produces memories. People with Alzheimer’s disease initially have difficulty remembering things. As the disease progresses, plaques and plaques also appear on the parts of the brain that control the body’s behavior.

Daily activities such as walking, eating, going to the toilet, and talking can be difficult.

The effects of the disease will vary from person to person as they get worse. The speed can slow down. Some people live for 20 years after being diagnosed. The average life expectancy, however, is 4 to 8 years.

Physical Changes You Can Expect

What symptoms do you have and when they appear they are different for everyone.

Some people have physical problems before they lose great memory.

Some of the changes you may have are:

  • Loss of balance or co-operation
  • Strong muscles
  • Pushing or dragging feet when walking
  • Problems with standing or sitting high in a chair
  • Weak muscles and fatigue

When and how often do you sleep?

Problems with control of your bladder or intestines
Trembling and uncontrollable movement

Care Challenges

Over time, many people with Alzheimer’s disease lose their ability to care for themselves. You may need help with basic things like brushing your teeth, washing your hair and body, and changing your clothes.

It may be difficult to have a meaningful conversation. Caregivers are encouraged to limit contact with simple topics and to ask questions with specific answers. In later stages, you may lose your ability to speak.

Chewing and swallowing may be difficult. That raises the risk of choking or sniffing food. Your food and snacks will need to be cut into small pieces or cleaned. If you do not get enough food and drink, you may become malnourished or dehydrated. Drinks and vitamin supplements can help you get nutrients.

In some cases, you may have to move to a nursing home to receive the care you need. Talk to your doctor and family about the best place for your needs.

How to Cover the Body

As your body slows down it raises the risk of other health problems.

  • Bacteria may develop as your immune system begins to fail.
  • Pneumonia can start, especially if you inhale the wrong food or drink.
  • Fall injuries are more likely to occur.

Many people with Alzheimer’s disease die of pneumonia, other illnesses, or heart disease.

These conversations can be difficult, but having a plan can make it easier for you and your family.

Alzheimer’s and Agitation: Auxiliary Treatment

People with Alzheimer’s disease can easily get anxious or irritable. They may not rest, sleep, or run back and forth.

Often, change is a major cause of anxiety. It may be the difference in their path, the environment, or the caregivers they see. Sometimes, it comes from fear or fatigue, which is common with Alzheimer’s. In some cases, the disorder may be due to an infection or other medical condition.

Care Tips

  • You may be able to reduce the anger by simplifying their routine or by interrupting them to deal with stress. Here are a few things you can try:
  • Build a quiet place for them. Cut back the sound on the TV or radio, remove clutter, and make their daily tasks as easy as possible.
  • Check for possible physical causes, such as hunger, thirst, need to use the toilet, or extreme heat or cold.
  • Exercise can relieve anxiety and depression. They go for a walk, go gardening, or play their favorite music and dance.
  • Use low light or night lights to help them feel confused and scared at night.
  • Keep your emotions in check. You may feel frustrated, but try to keep your voice calm and firm and avoid arguing or criticizing them.

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